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AMERICAN RYE WHISKEY HISTORY BORN IN LANCASER CO, PA.

“The Bomberger Distillery Complex (just over 5 miles from Stoll & Wolfe) represents the transformation of whiskey distilling from a seasonal agricultural enterprise into a large-scale industry specializing in the year- round production of distilled spirits.” -National Register Historic Places

National Register of Historic Places Nomination: The distillation of spirituous liquors is a major American industry, and the Bomberger Distillery, whose origins can be traced back to 1753 is both the Nation’s oldest distillery and a primary extant example of the small scale commercial distilling operations which enabled the United States to become the world’s largest producer and largest consumer of whiskey.  Click Here for Full 1975 Submission – PA Historical & Museum Commission.

From National Park Service National Historic Landmarks Program: Dating from 1753, the Bomberger’s Distillery in PA, the Nation’s oldest distillery, represented the transformation of whiskey distilling from an agricultural enterprise into a large-scale industry.

  • The site has a documented history of spirit production dating back to 1753. Bomberger's listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975, declared a National Historic Landmark in 1980, and was America's smallest commercial distiller at the time of its 1989 closure.

  • The National Register of Historic Places lists Bomberger’s Distillery amongst the most significant locations in American Manufacturing History amongst the original Anheuser-Busch Brewery, Coca-Cola Bottling Plant in Georgia, Duke Homestead and Tobacco Factory in North Carolina, and the Milton Hershey Mansion. 

“Whether or not you’re a whiskey drinker, it’s difficult to imagine Lancaster’s countryside filled with rye fields and dotted with distilleries. Such a scenario existed during the 18th and early 19th centuries. According to an article read before the Lancaster County Historical Society in the 1920s, 183 distilleries had existed in Lancaster County in 1813…What was the reason behind the proliferation of distilleries? A need grew out an abundance of rye grain harvested across the region’s farmlands. Rather than let crops go to waste, farmers could preserve their rye yield and turn it into a tradable commodity, a currency by the gallon or barrel.” -Jordan Bush, Lancaster County Magazine

"If the name Dick Stoll rings a bell, that’s because Mr. Stoll was the last master distiller at Pennsylvania’s Michter’s where he also distilled bourbon for the A.H. Hirsch Bourbon brand. He was trained by Charles Everett Beam who was the grandnephew of the legendary Jim Beam himself." -Breaking Bourbon

"...They produced whiskey not far away, at a distillery that’s since closed down: the (Pennsylvania) Michter’s distillery, where they made the excellent whiskey that has become a legend under the A.H. Hirsch name. Though the distillery has been closed for almost 30 years, the master distiller, Dick Stoll, still lives nearby. He’s more than 80 years old and in startlingly good health, and is helping a new distillery, Stoll & Wolfe, get started there." -Lew Bryson, The Daily Beast

FULL 250+ YEARS OF LOCAL WHISKEY HISTORY TIMELINE HERE